Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (WE HAVE A WINNER!)

Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (WE HAVE A WINNER!)

by salome » Mon Dec 28, 2015 6:43 pm

The state, not a person. :wink:

Hope you all have been having a fabulous holiday season! Now that I've recovered from the chaos of Christmas, it's time to get the next game going! :tizzy:

Signups are starting now and will run through the 9th of January, to give everyone ample time to decide if they want to play. Numbers will be picked out of a hat by my kids, and first numbers will be posted January 10th!

This game's focus is Virginia, home to many people, places, and things that are the backbone of America. Virginia just happens to be my state - where I was born, raised, and live.

Please choose ten of the numbers below and PM them to me. First to PM me BINGO! when they've gotten all ten will receive a gift certificate to a stitchy retailer of their choosing. They will then be in charge of hosting the next game.

The numbers are:

1. American Dogwood
2. American Foxhound
3. Arlington National Cemetery
4. Appomattox Court House
5. Booker T. Washington
6. Brook Trout
7. Cardinal
8. Charlottesville
9. Chesapeake Bay
10. Chief Powhatan
11. Chincoteague
12. Colonial Williamsburg
13. Eastern Oyster
14. George Washington
15. Hampton Roads
16. Jamestown
17. John Smith
18. Maggie Walker
19. Monticello
20. Mount Vernon
21. Patrick Henry
22. Pocahontas
23. Richmond
24. Robert E. Lee
25. Skyline Drive
26. Square Dancing
27. Thomas Jefferson
28. Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly
29. Virginia State Parks
30. Yorktown

Best of luck to all!
Last edited by salome on Thu Jan 28, 2016 2:24 pm, edited 11 times in total.
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by lavenderbee » Tue Dec 29, 2015 4:59 pm

Well Salome I know a lot about Virginia now but when I first read it I thought you had put ' virginals' as in the old instrument. Read it again & realised it is about Virginia. I am not joining in this time but thought it would make you laugh. I know the virginal stood on legs & ladies sat down to play the instrument but I do not think you would have been able to get many numbers out of it..... @rotfl:
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by rcperryls » Tue Dec 29, 2015 5:37 pm

I'll be sending you my choices probably after the New Year. I have been to Virginia several times and it is lovely! University of Virginia is one of the most beautiful cities I have been to. Looking forward to this Bingo!

Carole
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by cairee » Tue Dec 29, 2015 5:59 pm

sent in my numbers!
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by fccs » Tue Dec 29, 2015 7:01 pm

My number have been sent - I'm feeling lucky. :-)
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by salome » Wed Dec 30, 2015 12:41 am

lavenderbee - I had never heard of virginals before! I've learned something!

Carole - looking forward to getting your numbers!

I have these wonderful folks down:

Cairee
Debby
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by rcperryls » Wed Dec 30, 2015 9:48 pm

Numbers sent so you can add me to the list now!

Carole
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by jocellogirl » Thu Dec 31, 2015 12:19 am

I'll get the girls to pick some numbers and will pm them tomorrow.
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by salome » Fri Jan 01, 2016 12:42 am

I have numbers for these fabulous stitchers:

Cairee
Debby (fccs)
Carole (rcperryls)

(Happy New Year!)
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by salome » Wed Jan 06, 2016 1:39 pm

I'm currently sick with a head cold (yuck!) and will be extending signups through the end of the week. Hope to get more players!
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by rcperryls » Wed Jan 06, 2016 1:48 pm

I hope that you feel better soon. Head colds are never good. Stay warm now that winter has hit the East Coast. I know a lot of people with colds right now. And I'm sure if more people signed up for Bingo that would help you to feel better. hint hint to those of you who aren't sure about joining in

Carole
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by salome » Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:37 pm

What a week! Computer troubles resulted in a new shiny toy for me. I'll be posting the first two numbers at about 6PM Eastern Time, so if you haven't signed up, hop to it!!
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by fccs » Sun Jan 10, 2016 7:20 pm

Yay - new computer's are fun (other than the paying for them part).

I'm looking forward to the Bingo game - I hope you get more signups because the more the merrier!
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Signups Open til Ja

by salome » Sun Jan 10, 2016 11:08 pm

(New computers are wonderful! However, my fingers do not like the new keyboard!)

Where two or three are gathered....

Today's numbers, plucked from a hat by my 4 year old, are:

18: Maggie L. Walker

Image

Maggie Lena (Mitchell) Walker was born in July 1864 in Richmond, Virginia to William Mitchell and Elizabeth Draper Mitchell. As a child, she attended the newly formed Richmond Public Schools and helped her mother by delivering clean clothes. At the age of fourteen she joined the Independent Order of St. Luke. A fraternal burial society, St. Luke administered to the sick and aged, promoted humanitarian causes and encouraged individual self-help and integrity. Maggie served in several capacities, from that of a delegate to the biannual convention to top leadership position of Right Worthy Grand Secretary in 1899. She became a teacher, teaching grade school for three years until her marriage to Armstead Walker Jr., a brick contractor in 1886. The couple had two sons, Russell and Melvin. In 1904, Armstead and Maggie purchased a home.

In 1902, she established a newspaper for St. Luke, and shortly thereafter chartered the St. Luke Penny Savings Bank. Mrs. Walker served as the bank's first president, earning her the recognition of being the first black woman to charter a bank in the United States. She later served as chariman of the board of directors when the bank merged with two other Richmond area banks. Maggie became a widow in 1915, when one of her sons mistook his father for an intruder and shot and killed him one night. Maggie's work and investments kept the family comfortable. When her sons married they brought their wives to her home on East Leigh Street in Richmond's Jackson Ward district, the center of the city's African American business and social life around the start of the 20th century.

Maggie Walker received an honorary master's degree from Virginia Union University in 1923. A diabetic, she spent the last several years of her life confined to a wheelchair. On December 15, 1934 she died at the age of 70 from complications of the disease. In 1979, her home on East Leigh Street was purchased by the National Parks Service and became a National Historic Site.

25: Skyline Drive

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Skyline Drive is a 109-mile road that runs the entire length of the Shenandoah National Park in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. The scenic drive is particularly popular in the fall when the leaves are changing colors. Annually, over two million people visit the Drive,, which has been designated a National Scenic Byway.

Begun as a Works Progress Administration project during the Great Depression, construction of the Drive began in 1931, and the final section was completed in 1939. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) also graded slopes on both sides of the roadway, built guardrails, constructed overlooks, and planted thousands of trees and shrubbery along the parkway.

The road takes a winding path along the mountaintops of the Blue Ridge Mountains east of the Shenandoah River. There are seventy-five overlooks throughout the drive, providing views of the surrounding valleys. During the drive, wildlife - from deer to bears and nearly everything in bewteen - can be seen in the road. Numerous trails are available, including a portion of the Appalacian Trail.

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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (First Numbers Up!)

by cairee » Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:08 am

wow I have got to drive that road! gorgeous!

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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (First Numbers Up!)

by rcperryls » Mon Jan 11, 2016 2:28 pm

None for me today :( , but interesting info and gorgeous pic!! :D

Carole
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O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (First Numbers Up!)

by fccs » Mon Jan 11, 2016 3:55 pm

Very interesting!! Oh, and I've got one.
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (First Numbers Up!)

by salome » Mon Jan 11, 2016 10:03 pm

Yes, driving the Skyline Drive is a must! Speaking from experience, it is beautiful in all four seasons, but especially gorgeous during autumn.

Today's numbers are:

10 – Chief Powhatan

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Wahunsenacawh, the proper name of Powhatan, was the paramount chief of Tsenacommacah, which was an allegiance of Algonquian-speaking Virginia Native Americans. Little is known of his life before the arrival of English colonists in 1607. It is believed he inherited leadership of four to six tribes at a young age, and through diplomacy and/or force had assembled an estimated 30 tribes by the early 17th century. Known as the Powhatan Confederacy, the tribes included between 10,000 and 15,000 people. At its height, Powhatan’s realm, Tsenacommacah, extended across 10,000 square miles from the banks of the James River north to the Potomac River and from the Atlantic Ocean west to the rolling hills of the Piedmont.

Captain John Smith was the Jamestown leader with most direct contact with Powhatan during the first years of the English settlement, but Powhatan never visited Jamestown. In 1609, he ordered his warriors to lay siege to James Ford, which led to the “starving time” winter that killed several hundred colonists. This began the first Anglo-Powhatan war, which lasted until the 1614 marriage of Powhatan’s daughter, Pocahontas, to English colonist John Rolfe. The marriage had the blessing of Powhatan and led to a relatively peaceful period in relations between the two peoples.

Powhatan died in April 1618. His burial mount is located in the Pamunkey Indian Reservation in King William, where his remains were relocated to by his brother, Opechancanough. Powhatan County was named in his honor.

Recently, archaeologists discovered the site of Werowocooco – Powhatan’s center on the banks of York River – and have found the footprint of a longhouse that may have been his residence.

21 – Patrick Henry

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Patrick Henry, an American attorney, planter, and politician, became known as an orator during the movement for independence in Virginia during the 1770s. A Founding Father, he served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia.

Born in 1736 at the family farm, Henry attended local schools for a few years until being tutored by his father. In 1754 he married Sarah Shelton. He began his career as a planter, but the soil was poor and their main house was destroyed by fire in 1757. He tried a mercantile store, but it failed. While reading for the law, he continued to farm at his home, Pine Slash Plantation, before qualifying as a lawyer in 1760.
He gained local attention in a case that dealt with whether the price of tobacco paid to established clergy for their services should be set by the colonial government or by the Crown. The case was dubbed the “Parson’s Cause” and took place in 1763. Henry was brought in at the last minute to argue on behalf of Louisa County. He delivered an impassioned speech that denounced clerics as “enemies of the community” and any king who annulled good laws as a “tyrant” who “forfeits all right to his subject’s obedience.”

In 1765 Henry was elected for the House of Burgesses. When he arrived in Williamsburg, the legislature was already in session. Nine days after being sworn in, he introduced the Virginia Stamp Act Resolutions, “in language so extreme that some Virginians said it smacked of treason.” The new representative waited for an opportunity when the more conservative members of the House were away. With just 24% attendance, he succeeded, through much debate, in getting his proposal passed. Many colonists considered his words inflammatory: “If this be treason, make the most of it!”

Patrick Henry is best known for the speech he made on March 23, 1775. With the House undecided on whether to mobilize for military action against the encroaching British military force, Henry argued in favor and ended his speech with words that have since become immortalized: “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!”

In 1775 he was commissioned as a colonel of the 1st Virginia Regiment. Henry led militia against the Royal Governor Lord Dunmore in an event known as the Gunpowder Incident. In 1776, he was elected by the new state legislature as the first post-colonial Governor of Virginia. He was twice re-elected. He was again elected for a one-year term as governor in 1784, and re-elected twice more, serving until 1786. He served as representative to the Virginia convention of 1788, where he argued against ratifying the U. S. Constitution on the grounds that it gave too much power to the federal government. Henry was instrumental in having the Bill of Rights adopted to amend the new Constitution and protect individual rights.

Henry retired to his 520-acre plantation of Redhill in Charlotte County, where he conducted his law practice, in 1794. President John Adams nominated Henry as special emissary to France in 1798, but he declined due to failing health. At the urging of George Washington, Henry stood for and was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, but three months prior to taking his seat he died of stomach cancer on June 6, 1799.
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (First Numbers Up!)

by rcperryls » Tue Jan 12, 2016 1:06 pm

Both for me today!! :) And really interesting info about two very strong men.

Carole
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Re: Bingo - Let's Learn About Virginia! (Second Numbers Up!)

by salome » Wed Jan 13, 2016 12:01 am

I apologize in advance for the length of today's numbers. :oops: It's so hard to pare down on the amount of information!

Today's numbers are:

15: Hampton Roads

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Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and a metropolitan region in Southeastern Virginia. It comprises the Virginia Beach, Norfolk, and Newport News area, and has an extended area that includes areas of Northeastern North Carolina. Hampton Roads is known for its large military presence, ice-free harbor, shipyards, coal piers, and miles of waterfront property and beaches.

The body of water known as Hampton Roads is one of the world’s largest natural harbors. It incorporates the mouths of the Elizabeth River, Nansemond River, and James River, as well as several smaller rivers, and empties into the Chesapeake Bay. The term “Roads” is short for roadstead, a body of water sheltered from rip currents where ships can lie reasonably safe at anchor. The word Hampton honors one of the founders of the Virginia Company of London, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton.

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Hundreds of historical sites in the area, comprising over 400 years of American history, as well as other attractions, draw visitors around the world each year. The National Park Service’s Colonial Parkway joins the Historic Triangle – Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown – with a scenic roadway carefully shielded from views of commercial development. Busch Gardens Williamsburg and Water Country USA are major theme parks located near Williamsburg, as is Williamsburg Pottery Factory. (Not to mention the Williamsburg Outlet Stores!)

Museums include the Mariners’ Museum – an institution dedicated to bringing maritime history to the world. It is currently home of the USS Monitor Center, where 210 tons of artifacts from the USS Monitor as held, including a gun turret. The Virginia War Museum covers American military history and its collection includes weapons, vehicles, artifacts, and uniforms from various periods of American history. The Virginia Living Museum is themed on the geographic regions of Virginia, from the Appalachian Mountains to the offshore waters of the Atlantic Ocean. NASA’s Langley Research Center is in Hampton, and is the original training ground for the Mercury Seven, Gemini, and Apollo Astronauts. Virginia Air and Space Museum, also in Hampton, allows visitors to learn about the region’s aviation history.

The U. S. military has a strong presence in the area. Camp Peary, Coast Guard Training Center, Langley Air Force Base, Naval Air Station Oceana, Naval Station Norfolk, and Norfolk Naval Shipyard are just a few. The Hampton Roads area has the largest concentrations of military bases and facilities of any metropolitan area in the world. Nearly one-fourth of the nation’s active duty military personnel are stationed in Hampton Roads.

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The Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, a 23-mile fixed link crossing at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, connects the Delmarva Peninsula (Delmarva is a clipped compound of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia). Among the key features are two 1-mile tunnels and two side-by-side high-level bridges. The remaining portion comprises low-level trestle, causeway, and four man-made islands. The CBBT is not considered just a transportation facility, but is a destination itself. Drivers can stop at two scenic overlooks. One at the north end of the bridge and at Sea Gull Island, near the south end. At Sea Gull Island, passing ships may include Navy warships, nuclear submarines, and aircraft carriers, as well as large cargo vessels and sailing ships. Fishing is encouraged from the 625-foot long pier, which is open 24 hours a day year round.

27: Thomas Jefferson

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Thomas Jefferson, born in April 1743 in Shadwell (near Charlottesville), was an American Founding Father. At the age of 14 his father died, and Thomas inherited approximately 5,000 acres of land. He began his childhood education with tutors at Tuckahoe Plantation, the home of his Randolph cousins. He attended a local school run by a Presbyterian minister and started studying Latin, Greek, and French. At age 16 he entered the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, where he studied mathematics, metaphysics and philosophy. He graduated two years after starting and proceeded to read the law under Professor George Wythe. Historically famed for his love of books, he was devastated with his Shadwell home, including a library of 200 volumes, was destroyed by fire in 1770. By 1814, his collection had grown to almost 6,500 volumes.

Jefferson was admitted to the bar in 1767. In addition to practicing law, he represented Albemarle County in the House of Burgesses from 1769 to 1775. He pursued reforms to slavery. He once waived his fee for a client who claimed he should be freed, arguing “everyone comes into the world with a right to his own person and using it at his own will.” The judge ruled against the client. Jefferson later incorporated his argument into the Declaration of Independence.

In 1768 he began constructing his primary residence, Monticello, on a hilltop overlooking his plantation. On January 1, 1772, Jefferson married his third cousin Martha Wayles Skelton. Martha suffered from ill health, including diabetes, and frequent childbirth weakened her. A few months after the birth of her last child, she died in September 1782 at the age of 33.

At the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, Jefferson served as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress. John Adams, a leader of the Congress, supported Jefferson’s appointment to the Committee of Five formed to write the Declaration. It was decided that Jefferson would write the first draft. Jefferson drew on his own work as well as other sources and, after a few changes by other committee members, a final draft was presented to Congress on June 28, 1776. On July 4, 1776, Congress ratified the Declaration, and delegates signed it on August 2.

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Jefferson was elected governor of post-colonial Virginia for one-year terms in 1779 and 1780. He transferred the state capital from Williamsburg to Richmond. While governor, he introduced measures for public education, religious freedom, and revision of inheritance laws.

Following a peace treaty with Great Britain in 1783, Jefferson was appointed a Virginia delegate to the newly-formed Congress of the Confederation. He was sent to join Benjamin Franklin and John Adams as ministers in Europe for negotiation of trade with England, Spain, and France. While in France he became a regular companion of the Marquis de Lafayette, and used his influence to obtain trade agreements with France. As the French Revolution began, Jefferson allowed his residence to be used for meetings by Lafayette; he was in Paris during the storming of the Bastille and was consulted by Lafayette while the latter drafted the Declarations of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. During the French Revolution, Jefferson often found his mail opened, so he invented his own ciphering device and communicated in code for the rest of his career. Jefferson remained a firm supporter of the French Revolution while opposing its more violent elements.

In 1800 Jefferson contended against John Adams for the office of president. On February 17, 1801 the House elected Jefferson president. In 1802 he instructed James Monroe to negotiate with Napoleon to purchase New Orleans and adjacent coastal areas from France. On July 4, 1803 the Senate ratified the purchase treaty of over a million square miles. He arranged for the exploration and mapping of the uncharted territory to the Pacific Ocean. The most well-known of these expeditions of the one by Lewis and Clark, but there were also the William Dunbar and George Hunter expedition on the Ouachita River, the Thomas Freeman and Peter Custis expedition on the Red River, and the Zebulon Pike Expeditions into the Rocky Mountains.

Jefferson was a farmer, obsessed with new crops, soil conditions, garden designs, and agricultural techniques. His other interest, architecture, was mastered through self-study, and he helped popularize the Neo-Palladian style in the United States. He utilized designs for the Virginia State Capitol, the University of Virginia, Monticello, and others. He was interested in birds and wine, was a noted gourmet. He was also a prolific writer and linguist, and spoke several languages. He invented many small practical devices, including a revolving book-stand and a “Great Clock” powered by gravitational pull on cannonballs. He improved the pedometer and the polygraph (a device for duplicating writing). He is also credited as the creator of the swivel chair, the first of which he created and used to write much of the Declaration of Independence.

Image

Following his political retirement, Jefferson continued his pursuits of educational interests. He envisioned a university free of church influences where students could specialize in many new areas not offered at other colleges. In 1819 the 76-year-old Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. He was the principal designer of the buildings, planned the university’s curriculum, and served as the first rector upon its opening in 1825.

His health began to deteriorate in 1825, due to a combination of rheumatism from arm and wrist injuries as well as intestinal and urinary disorders. By June 1826 he was confined to bed. Overcome by fever, he died on July 4, 1826, the fiftieth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.

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