Christmas Bingo - Last two numbers up

Re: Christmas Bingo - Twelfth numbers are up

by chalicedhearts » Sat Dec 12, 2015 11:17 pm

8/10 here still....I love reading about all the Christmas Traditions.
Gary Zahn
WIP: The Accolade
Disney Cinderella Castle
Moonlight Cabin
Celtic Cross Storykeep
Power and Grace
User avatar
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:57 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Christmas Bingo - Twelfth numbers are up

by salome » Sun Dec 13, 2015 6:12 pm

Still at 9/10!

So much great info, Jo! I've pulled a little of it to share with my kids, who are always full of questions about Christmas traditions.
User avatar
 
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:35 pm
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: Christmas Bingo - Twelfth numbers are up

by jocellogirl » Sun Dec 13, 2015 8:04 pm

Number are up. Have we got anyone calling BINGO today?
Here they are:

19. Nine Lessons and Carols

The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a service of Christian worship celebrating the birth of Jesus that is traditionally followed at Christmas. The story of the fall of humanity, the promise of the Messiah, and the birth of Jesus is told in nine short Bible readings from Genesis, the prophetic books and the Gospels, interspersed with the singing of Christmas carols, hymns and choir music.
In 1878 the Royal Cornwall Gazette reported that the choir of Truro Cathedral would sing a service of carols at 10:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve.
“The Choir of the Cathedral will sing a number of carols in the Cathedral on Christmas Eve, the service commencing at 10pm. We understand that this is at the wish of many of the leading parishioners and others. A like service has been instituted in other cathedral and large towns, and has been much appreciated. It is the intention of the choir to no longer continue the custom of singing carols at the residences of members of the congregation.”
Two years later, Edward Benson, later Archbishop of Canterbury but at that time Bishop of Truro, in Cornwall, formalised the service with Nine Lessons for use on Christmas Eve 1880. The first service took place at 10:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve in the temporary wooden structure serving as his cathedral whilst the new cathedral was being built. Over 400 people attended this first service. There is an oft-repeated myth that the purpose of the service was to keep men out of the pubs.
The service has subsequently been in continuous use (with modifications) in Truro since 1880, and followed Bishop Benson in his new appointment as Archbishop of Canterbury in 1883. In December 2013 Truro Cathedral staged a reconstruction of Bishop Benson's original 1880 Nine Lessons with Carols Service which was attended by an audience of over 1,500 people.
The original liturgy has since been adapted and used by other churches all over the world. Lessons and Carols most often occur in Anglican churches. However, numerous Christian denominations have adopted this service, or a variation on this service, as part of their Christmas celebrations. In the UK, the service has become the standard format for schools' Christmas carol services.
The best-known version is broadcast annually from King's College, Cambridge, on Christmas Eve. It features carols sung by the famous Choir of King's College. Groton School of Groton, Massachusetts, has performed the festival longer than any institution other than King's, holding its first Lessons and Carols in 1928.

29. Wigilia

Wigilia (Polish pronunciation: [viˈɡilʲa]) is the traditional Christmas Eve vigil supper in Poland, held on December 24th. The term is often applied to the whole day of the Christmas Eve, extending further into Pasterka, the midnight Mass held at Roman Catholic churches all over Poland and in large Polish communities worldwide at midnight preceding the Christmas Day.
The word Wigilia derives from the Latin verb vigilare, "to watch", and literally means "eve". The feasting traditionally begins once the First Star has been sighted (usually by children) in the heavens at dusk (around 5 p.m.). Therefore Christmas is also sometimes called "Gwiazdka" (the little star, referring to the Star of Bethlehem).
Children usually decorate the Christmas tree on this day (if it has not been set up before). Often a bundle of hay is placed under the tablecloth or in each of the four corners of the room to symbolize the fact that Jesus was born in a manger.
As a game, children would remove pieces of straw from under the table. Green would mean a year of wealth or possibly a marriage, while a black piece of hay would mean bad luck much like the "piece of coal" represents in modern Christmas lore. The drawing of hay was only for fun and was rarely paid attention to. Various other divinations are semi-seriously practiced such as hiding a nut (or another small food piece) in a cake and dividing it among family members. Whoever finds the nut inside his portion is guaranteed to have a successful year.
Another tradition practiced by some, is to leave one extra place-setting for an "unexpected guest". This is to celebrate the tradition of hospitality and inclusion. The empty seat is left open just in case a traveler, family member, or a friend knocks on the door, so there would be a place for them to join in the celebrations.
Family members begin the celebration with a prayer and breaking of the Christmas wafer (opłatek - symbolizing the bread eaten daily — our day-to-day common life; very old Christian tradition of sharing bread) and wishing each other good fortune in the upcoming new year. (After the prayer, usually done by the man of the house, the opłatek is broken and pieces are given to everyone attending the table. From there, everyone breaks off a piece of their opłatek, and shares it with everyone else, wishing luck and joy in the upcoming year, for Christ has been born. This wish is usually finalized by a kiss on the cheek.) Readings from the Bible concerning the nativity of Jesus are practiced in more religious households. In the countryside, it is customary to feed livestock (though not dogs, cats, and other pets) with the wafer, as the animals of the household are to be treated as people that day and are traditionally believed to speak with a human voice at midnight.
After the First Star appears in the sky and after sharing the Christmas wafer (opłatek), the Supper begins. A traditional Christmas meal in Poland includes fish dishes and Borscht (beetroot soup) with Uszka (tortellini). Fish provides a main component of the Christmas Eve meal across Poland; since 1940 more popular are carp fillet, carp in aspic etc. Wigilia is observed as a Black Fast meaning that most Poles abstain from eating meat on this day. Many households also prepare a great variety of special Christmas rollmops, matjas herring, poppy seed cakes (makowiec), dried fruit compote and other delicacies including edible Christmas ornaments. Common dishes are various fruits (dried apples, plums, apricots, dates, etc.) and salads. Regional dishes include żurek, siemieniotka (in Silesia), mushroom soup, different salads, pierogi filled with cheese and potatoes as well as cooked dried mushrooms and cabbage (kapusta) or cabbage and yellow peas; stuffed cabbage with mushrooms and rice gołąbki (cabbage rolls), kluski with poppyseed, kutia, and makówki (in Silesia).
It is still believed that whatever happens on Wigilia has an impact on the following year. So, if a quarrel should arise, it foretells a quarrelsome and troublesome year.
The number of country courses is traditionally established to be either twelve or an odd number (in Silesia); Twelve is symbolic of the number of months in the year as well as to celebrate the twelve disciples of Jesus.
Some families as well as individual worshippers attend the traditional midnight mass/Shepherd's Mass (pasterka), where Christmas carols are also sung.
A major part of the Wigilia festivities is the opening of gifts. The children often open their gifts and hand out the gifts for the adults from under the tree. The gift-giver in Polish tradition is the Gwiazdka – Saint Nicholas' feminine counterpart – or the Gwiazdor (masculine), which is either a Pagan tradition, or represents the little Star of Bethlehem. Saint Nicholas brings gifts on December 6th. However this varies and in some families Saint Nicholas is said to bring presents both on the 6th and on Christmas.
Christmas Day is a national holiday in Poland and most Poles spend the day feasting with their family. Followed by Christmas Eve (Wigilia) there are two more days of Christmas celebration. Christmas breakfast often consists of scrambled eggs, cold-cuts served with horseradish sauce, smoked or fried salmon, marinated salads, coffee, tea and cakes, i.e. poppy seed roll, gingerbread (piernik) cake and cookies, kutia, etc.
Image
Jo x

WIP:
Celtic Autumn

On the back burner:
HAEDs Rhyme and Reason
Trio Godspeed Sistine Chapel

Around the World in 80 stitches, Herbularius
User avatar
 
Posts: 4042
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:05 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Re: Christmas Bingo - Thirteenth numbers are up

by salome » Sun Dec 13, 2015 8:54 pm

No Bingo for me, but a lot are close! :tizzy: :tizzy:
User avatar
 
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:35 pm
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: Christmas Bingo - Thirteenth numbers are up

by cairee » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:03 pm

none for me, still at 9/10
:wip:
Mables 2016 SAL
Holland Springtime Mandalla (chatelaine)
User avatar
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:33 pm
Location: BC Canada

Re: Christmas Bingo - Thirteenth numbers are up

by Linda Rose » Sun Dec 13, 2015 10:41 pm

All of a sudden I am at 9, having enjoyed reading about 2 customs I knew very little about. Thanks Jo for all of the thought put into this. It really does help one to prepare well for Christmas.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Christmas Bingo - Thirteenth numbers are up

by rcperryls » Mon Dec 14, 2015 3:25 pm

I had never heard of either of those traditions and found them very interesting also. Did finally get my 8th pick so 8/10 as of today. We could have a winner today so good luck all!

Carole
:dance:
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26971
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Christmas Bingo - Thirteenth numbers are up

by jocellogirl » Mon Dec 14, 2015 7:39 pm

There are only four numbers left! Surely someone will shout tonight!!
They are:

15. King’s College Cambridge

The choir at King's College, Cambridge was created by King Henry VIII and he said there were to be 16 boy choristers. Now there are normally between 15 and 18 choristers in the choir; this is because there are sometimes one or two extra boys in case some of the choristers have their voices break and so can no longer sing the choir! This happened in 2014 when there were 17 at the start of the school year, but by mid December one voice had broken and so they were back to the correct 16! The boys are aged between 8 and 13.
The preparation for Advent and Christmas starts in late November when the boys are given the 'Christmas Booklet' which contains all the carols and songs which they will be performing over the Christmas period. This is very exciting and the boys look through the booklet to see if their favourite songs and carols will be sung that year.
Throughout the year, the choristers rehearse every day and sing five days a week at six services in the College chapel. The time running up to Christmas is a busy time for the choir and choristers but also a fun one, which they look forward to and really enjoy.
The Advent Sunday service is the start of their seasonal singing and after the service there's an Advent party for the choir. This is very popular as it includes a mince pie eating contest, the winning number at the moment being 15.
In the first 10 days on December, normally on a Tuesday, there is a 'dress rehearsal' service in the chapel. This is the first chance for the choir to sing most of their Christmas material. Local schools send some of their children to the service as a chance to hear the world famous choir. The famous 'Once in Royal David’s City' first verse solo is sung three times over the Christmas period: at the 'dress rehearsal' service, at 'Carol's from Kings' and at the 'Nine Lessons and Carols service'. All the choristers want the honour of being one of the boys chosen to sing the solos. The soloists are chosen by the Choir's director, Stephen Cleobury.
The 'Carols from King's' service is recorded by BBC TV on the Sunday following the 'dress rehearsal' service. Lots of rehearsals take place on the Friday and Saturday before the filming and recording on the Sunday. After the filming of 'Carols from King's' there's a little break for the choristers including a team building and fun day.
During the next week they normally perform at one or two Christmas Concerts. including at the Royal Albert Hall where they lead the thousands of people there in singing three carols.
Following the concerts, the boys go home for a few days, to spend some time off with their families and have a break. The choristers come back to the school on the 23rd of December to prepare for the important services on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. There are lots of rehearsals on the 23rd and then they visit the Provost of King's College (the head of the College) and receive some little gifts and then do something really fun like laser quest!
Christmas Eve is the day of 'Nine Lessons and Carols' so there's more rehearsals during the morning! The boy who will song the live solo to millions of people listening to the service around the world is chosen by the Choir director, Stephen Cleobury and he will start the service at 3.00pm UK time.
After the service there is a little party and then the choristers and their immediate families go to the school house to play some games and eat a big Christmas dinner. After the meal, the boys’ families leave and then there's lots more fun with them setting 'Santa Traps' and eating more mince pies! There's also a 'best decorated dorm' competition which is planned for several weeks in the run up to Christmas (they make paper chains and do craft activities like making Christmas wreaths). The boys get an allowance to choose some presents for themselves (normally ordered from online shops) and they also have some presents left by their families.
The choristers like to try and stay awake to spot Santa arriving, to see if he falls into any of their Santa traps - but the staff hope they will go to sleep! On Christmas morning they wake up early and sometimes go and sing carols outside the staff accommodation. There's also a Christmas morning pillow fight, which is looked forward to for weeks before Christmas! The boys often says that's the best bit about Christmas at King's! When they're up and dressed they have to hunt Santa, who is hidden somewhere in the school. When they find him they get some more presents! This is followed by a big breakfast ready for the Christmas morning service in the college chapel at 11.00am. After the Christmas morning service, the boys’ families come and see them in the school house and then they go home at 2.00pm. The choristers then have about a week at home with their families before they come back to the school to start the new year.
The boy choristers leave the choir at 13 to move on to senior school, so the choir always needs new boys to sing in it.

ImageImage
Image

25. Rudolph the red nosed reindeer
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a fictional male reindeer, usually depicted as a young calf who barely has antlers, with a glowing red nose, popularly known as "Santa's Ninth Reindeer." When depicted, he is the lead reindeer pulling Santa's sleigh on Christmas Eve. The luminosity of his nose is so great that it illuminates the team's path through inclement winter weather.
Rudolph first appeared in a 1939 booklet written by Robert L. May and published by Montgomery Ward.
The story is owned by The Rudolph Company, LP and has been adapted in numerous forms including a popular song, a television special and sequels, and a feature film and sequel. Character Arts, LLC manages the licensing for the Rudolph Company, LP. In many countries, Rudolph has become a figure of Christmas folklore. 2014 marked the 75th anniversary of the character and the 50th anniversary of the television special. A series of postage stamps featuring Rudolph was issued by the United States Postal Service on November 6, 2014.
Robert L. May created Rudolph in 1939, as an assignment for Chicago-based Montgomery Ward. The retailer had been buying and giving away colouring books for Christmas every year and it was decided that creating their own book would save money. Rudolph was supposed to be a moose but that was changed because a reindeer seemed friendly. May considered naming the reindeer "Rollo" or "Reginald" before deciding upon using the name "Rudolph". In its first year of publication, Montgomery Ward had distributed 2.5 million copies of Rudolph's story.
Of note is the change in the cultural significance of a red nose. In popular culture, a bright red nose was then closely associated with chronic alcoholism and drunkards, and so the story idea was initially rejected. May asked his illustrator friend at Wards, Denver Gillen, to draw "cute reindeer", using zoo deer as models. The alert, bouncy character Gillen developed convinced management to support the idea.
Maxton Books published the first mass-market edition of Rudolph and a sequel, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Shines Again, in 1954. In 1991, Applewood Books published Rudolph's Second Christmas, an unpublished sequel that Robert May wrote in 1947. In 2003, Penguin Books issued a reprint version of the original Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer with new artwork by Lisa Papp. Penguin also reprinted May's sequels, Rudolph Shines Again and Rudolph's Second Christmas (now retitled Rudolph to the Rescue).

Here's a little sing-a-long
Image
Jo x

WIP:
Celtic Autumn

On the back burner:
HAEDs Rhyme and Reason
Trio Godspeed Sistine Chapel

Around the World in 80 stitches, Herbularius
User avatar
 
Posts: 4042
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:05 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Re: Christmas Bingo - Fourteenth numbers are up

by salome » Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:56 pm

:tizzy: My first time playing and I won!!!
User avatar
 
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:35 pm
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: Christmas Bingo - Fourteenth numbers are up

by jocellogirl » Mon Dec 14, 2015 10:00 pm

Congratulations Salome!!!
You are the winner :whoop:
Jo x

WIP:
Celtic Autumn

On the back burner:
HAEDs Rhyme and Reason
Trio Godspeed Sistine Chapel

Around the World in 80 stitches, Herbularius
User avatar
 
Posts: 4042
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:05 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Re: Christmas Bingo - Fourteenth numbers are up

by rcperryls » Mon Dec 14, 2015 10:02 pm

I got one more so 9/10 for me. And I agree that surly someone will be shouting out loud later today. And Jo, interesting as always. I have read these through each day and have enjoyed it so much.

Carole
:dance:

eta: Congratulations Salome!!!!! :whoop: :whoop:
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26971
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Christmas Bingo - We have a winner!

by Squirrel » Mon Dec 14, 2015 10:05 pm

Congratulations Salome and Well Done.

Jo - thank you so much for a most interesting bingo. I have enjoyed reading it every day even though I didn't take part this time.
Sally in Brisbane Australia

WIPS

Dimensions Christmas Stocking.
Bookmarks

2016 Finishes.
Angel of the Morning by L&L
User avatar
 
Posts: 13714
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 3:33 am
Location: exChristhcurch NZ, now Brisbane, Australia

Re: Christmas Bingo - We have a winner!

by cairee » Tue Dec 15, 2015 12:13 am

oh rats! that makes 10 for me but too late in the day!

Congratulations Salome!
:wip:
Mables 2016 SAL
Holland Springtime Mandalla (chatelaine)
User avatar
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:33 pm
Location: BC Canada

Re: Christmas Bingo - We have a winner!

by Linda Rose » Tue Dec 15, 2015 1:31 am

I also made it to 10 today, but have just now checked in. Congratulations Salome! Thank you Jo for a wonderful BINGO and lead into Christmas.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Christmas Bingo - We have a winner!

by fccs » Tue Dec 15, 2015 2:49 am

I also had ten today - but I'm so happy to see another first-timer win. Congrats Salome!
Debby

WIPs
Tiramisu
Curl Up with a Good Book
Lorikeets
Wolf
Past Present Forever
Tulip Medley
User avatar
 
Posts: 6784
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:10 pm
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado

Re: Christmas Bingo - We have a winner!

by chalicedhearts » Tue Dec 15, 2015 12:46 pm

Congratulations Salome.... :whoop:.

Jo- Thanks for another exciting game of Bingo. This one was a lot of fun and I think got everyone into the Christmas spirit.
Gary Zahn
WIP: The Accolade
Disney Cinderella Castle
Moonlight Cabin
Celtic Cross Storykeep
Power and Grace
User avatar
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:57 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Christmas Bingo - We have a winner!

by jocellogirl » Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:10 pm

I've really enjoyed hosting this bingo and I've learned loads about the both Christmas traditions with which we are familiar and those which were new to me.
For completeness, I've included the two numbers which didn't get pulled.

Many congratulations to salome on winning her first BINGO. I'm looking forward to her game.

The last two numbers are

9. Christmas Tree Festival

Christmas Tree Festivals are a relatively new idea, whereby a large number of Christmas Trees are erected in church and are decorated by different groups of people such as the brownies, rainbows, the bell ringers, the church choir, the local school and various other individuals. This year, our Christmas tree festival at St. Peter's Harborne ran from Friday 27th to Sunday 29th November. The festival is generally held before the start of Advent, as Advent is a time where the church is not decorated and is a time of contemplation and preparation for Christmas. Our family decorated a tree this year and our theme was music. We made paper chains made out of music and hung lots of musical instrument ornaments on the tree and I had stitched some musically themed ornaments. Then, like a pillock, I forgot to take a photo of the tree!! At least we have the ornaments on our own tree at home now!
Here’s a picture of the festival two years ago.
Image


21. Pantomime

Pantomime (informally panto) is a type of musical comedy stage production, designed for family entertainment. It was developed in England and is still performed here, generally during the Christmas and New Year season and, to a lesser extent, in other English-speaking countries. Modern pantomime includes songs, slapstick comedy and dancing, employs gender-crossing actors, and combines topical humour with a story loosely based on a well-known fairy tale. It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers.
Traditionally performed at Christmas, with family audiences, British pantomime continues as a popular form of theatre, incorporating song, dance, buffoonery, slapstick, cross-dressing, in-jokes, topical references, audience participation, and mild sexual innuendo.
Pantomime story lines and scripts usually make no direct reference to Christmas, and are almost always based on traditional children's stories, particularly the fairy tales of Charles Perrault, Joseph Jacobs, Hans Christian Andersen and the Grimm Brothers. Classic pantomime stories include Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, Aladdin, Sleeping Beauty, Mother Goose, Dick Whittington and His Cat, Beauty and the Beast and Robinson Crusoe. 20th-century additions include Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Peter Pan and The Wizard of Oz. Traditional stories that are less frequently played today include Babes in the Wood (combined with elements of Robin Hood), Little Red Riding Hood, Puss in Boots, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Sinbad, St. George and the Dragon, and Bluebeard. Prior to about 1870, many other stories were made into pantomime.
While the familiarity of the audience with the original story is generally assumed, plot lines are almost always 'adapted' for comic or satirical effect, it being common for characters and situations from other stories to be interpolated into the plot. For instance "panto" versions of Aladdin may include elements from Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves or other Arabian Nights tales; while Jack and the Beanstalk might include references to nursery rhymes and other children's stories involving characters called "Jack", such as Jack and Jill. Certain familiar scenes tend to recur, regardless of plot relevance, and highly unlikely resolution of the plot is common. Straight retellings of the original stories are rare.
The form has a number of conventions, some of which have changed or weakened a little over the years, and by no means all of which are obligatory. Some of these conventions were once common to other genres of popular theatre such as melodrama.
• The leading male juvenile character (the principal boy) is traditionally played by a young woman, usually in tight-fitting male garments (such as breeches) that make her female charms evident. Her romantic partner is the principal girl, a female ingenue.
• An older woman (the pantomime dame – often the hero's mother) is usually played by a man in drag.
• Risqué double entendre, often wringing innuendo out of perfectly innocent phrases. This is, in theory, over the heads of the children in the audience and is for the entertainment of the adults.
• Audience participation, including calls of "He's behind you!" (or "Look behind you!"), and "Oh, yes it is!" and "Oh, no it isn't!" The audience is always encouraged to hiss the villain and "awwwww" the poor victims, such as the rejected dame, who is usually enamoured with the prince.
• Music may be original but is more likely to combine well-known tunes with re-written lyrics. At least one "audience participation" song is traditional: one half of the audience may be challenged to sing "their" chorus louder than the other half. Children in the audience may even be invited on stage to sing along with members of the cast.
• The animal, played by an actor in "animal skin" or animal costume. It is often a pantomime horse or cow, played by two actors in a single costume, one as the head and front legs, the other as the body and back legs.
• The good fairy enters from stage right (from the audience's point of view this is on the left) and the villain enters from stage left (right from the point of view of the audience). This convention goes back to the medieval mystery plays, where the right side of the stage symbolised Heaven and the left side symbolised Hell.
• A slapstick comedy routine may be performed, often a decorating or baking scene, with humour based on throwing messy substances. Until the 20th century, British pantomimes often concluded with a harlequinade, a free-standing entertainment of slapstick. Nowadays the slapstick is more or less incorporated into the main body of the show.
• In the 19th century, until the 1880s, pantomimes typically included a transformation scene in which a Fairy Queen magically transformed the pantomime characters into the characters of the harlequinade, who then performed the harlequinade.
• The Chorus, who can be considered extras on-stage, and often appear in multiple scenes (but as different characters) and who perform a variety of songs and dances throughout the show. Due to their multiple roles they may have as much stage-time as the lead characters themselves.
• At some point during the performance, characters including the Dame and the comic will sit on a bench and sing a cheerful song to forget their fears. The thing they fear appears behind them, but at first the characters ignore the audience's warnings of danger. The characters soon circle the bench, followed by the ghost, as the audience cries "It's behind you!" One by one, the characters see the ghost and run off, until at last the Dame and the ghost come face to face, whereupon the ghost, frightened by the visage of the Dame, runs away.
Image

:snowman: :snowman: MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!! :snowman: :snowman:
Jo x

WIP:
Celtic Autumn

On the back burner:
HAEDs Rhyme and Reason
Trio Godspeed Sistine Chapel

Around the World in 80 stitches, Herbularius
User avatar
 
Posts: 4042
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:05 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Re: Christmas Bingo - Last two numbers up

by fccs » Tue Dec 15, 2015 11:12 pm

You hosted a fantastic and interesting game, Jo. Thanks!
Debby

WIPs
Tiramisu
Curl Up with a Good Book
Lorikeets
Wolf
Past Present Forever
Tulip Medley
User avatar
 
Posts: 6784
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:10 pm
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado

Re: Christmas Bingo - Last two numbers up

by salome » Wed Dec 16, 2015 3:31 am

Thanks everyone for the congrats -- I'm still floored!

A HUGE thank you to Jo for hosting this game! I have so enjoyed learning the history behind traditions. It's definitely helped me get into the Christmas spirit!

Will spend the rest of the week finishing up my plans for my own game - It will be alright if I wait until after Christmas to start signups, etc. right?
User avatar
 
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:35 pm
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: Christmas Bingo - Last two numbers up

by cairee » Wed Dec 16, 2015 6:14 am

salome wrote:
Will spend the rest of the week finishing up my plans for my own game - It will be alright if I wait until after Christmas to start signups, etc. right?


for sure! the Holidays are busy for most people, signs ups after Christmas or even New years shouldn't upset anyone!
:wip:
Mables 2016 SAL
Holland Springtime Mandalla (chatelaine)
User avatar
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:33 pm
Location: BC Canada

PreviousNext

Who is online
Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest