Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by chalicedhearts » Fri Nov 13, 2015 5:20 pm

Well the butter tarts puts me up to 9/10 and they do sound really good. May have to look up a recipe for them. :D
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Fri Nov 13, 2015 6:47 pm

These are apparently quite good:

Ingredients:
2 crust pie dough, shaped into 2 logs and chilled (recipe follows)
½ cup unsalted butter
1 cup packed dark brown or demerara sugar
2 large eggs
½ cup maple syrup
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp vanilla extract
¼ tsp salt
OPTIONAL: ½ cup lightly toasted pecan pieces, walnut pieces, raisins, dried currants or chocolate chips

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400°F and lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin. Pull the chilled dough from the fridge 20 minutes before rolling out.
Cut each of the logs of chilled pie dough into six pieces. Roll each piece out onto a lightly floured work surface to just under a ¼-inch thick and use a 4 ½ inch round cookie cutter to cut each into a circle. Line each muffin cup with the pastry so that it comes about ½-inch higher than the muffin tin, and chill the lined tin while preparing the filling.
Melt the butter and brown sugar in pot on stove top over medium heat, stirring until the mixture is bubbling. Remove the pot from the heat.
In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs with the maple syrup, lemon juice, vanilla and salt. Slowly pour the hot sugar mixture into the egg while whisking constantly until incorporated.
OPTIONAL: Sprinkle a few pecan pieces (or walnuts, raisins or chocolate chips) into the bottom of each tart shells and ladle or pour the filling into each shell.
Bake the tarts for 10 minutes at 400°F, then reduce the oven temperature to 375°F and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes, until the filling is bubbling and the crust edges have browned.
Cool the tarts in the tin. After about five minutes, carefully twist them around in the pan to prevent sticking leaving them in the pan to cool completely.
The butter tarts should be stored in the fridge, but are best served at room temperature. The tarts can be stored chilled for up to three days.

Dough

Ingredients:
2 ¼ cups cake and pastry flour
2 Tbsp sugar
¾ tsp salt
1 cup cool unsalted butter, cut into pieces (pull from fridge 30 minutes before using)
6 Tbsp cool water
1 Tbsp lemon juice or white vinegar

Directions:
Stir the flour, sugar and salt to combine in a bowl or using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Cut in the butter by hand with a pastry cutter or on in the mixer on low speed until just small pieces of butter are visible and the mixture as a whole takes on a pale yellow colour (indicating that the butter has been worked in sufficiently).
Stir the water and lemon juice together and add to the dough, mixing until the dough just comes together. Shape the dough into two discs, wrap each and chill for at least two hours before rolling. Alternatively, the dough can be frozen for up to three months and thawed in the fridge prior to rolling.

Makes 12 butter tarts
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:34 pm

Butter tarts sound pretty yummy! And thanks to them, I now have seven.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:40 am

Turns out I will be working today, so here we go again nice and early!

13. Mickey
A 375 ml (13 ounces) bottle of liquor; designed to fit in your pocket

19. Robertson Screw
A screw having a square hole in the head into which a screwdriver with a square point (Robertson screwdriver (trademark) fits; named after its inventor P. L. Robertson (1896-1951), a Canadian industrialist - more to follow on both a UK and US connection, unless of course you know it already???
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:18 pm

:applesauce: Got both today so I'm up to 8/10!

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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:12 pm

Linda Rose wrote:
cairee wrote:up to 7 with butter tarts! I make between 8-12 dozen butter tarts every christmas. :D


Do you have a recipe to share?


1/2 cup brown sugar lightly packed
1/2 cup corn syrup
1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup raisins
12 tart shells, frozen or homemade

stir first 6 ingredients together, mix well.
place raisins in tart shells, spoon syrup over raisins distributing it evenly. bake at 425F for 12-15 minutes. cool and enjoy!


Im now at 8/10! getting close!
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by jocellogirl » Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:23 pm

Just catching up with bingo,
I've left it rather late.
I'm pleased it's not all over though,
As now I'm up to eight!
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:26 pm

Boy, I hate to post after Jo's clever poem...but it's eight for me, too. No poetry, just prose.

And Mickey is not what I was expecting - but my question is, why would I need a bottle to fit in my pocket? :-? :wine:
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:56 pm

Great poem Jo; glad to hear you are doing well!

Here is the promised UK, US connection to the Roberston Screw: Peter frequently told the story- now a legend – about the accident in downtown Montréal. He was demonstrating a spring-loaded screwdriver when the blade slipped from the screw-slot and badly cut his hand. The incident inspired him, so he decided to invent an improved and safer screw – The Robertson® Drive.
P.L Robertson always looked for a better way of doing things and enjoyed working on new innovations. Peter was awarded his first ‘original’ screw patent for the Robertson® drive when he was 30 years old and over the years P.L was successfully named an inventor, businessman and author.

To capture the global market PL Robertson was a major shareholder in Recess Screws Limited established at Gillingham, Kent England in 1913. P.L went overseas in 1912 to set up operations and showcase the new screw to the British Industrialists. Once operations were set up, P.L returned to Canada.

Soon after Recess Screws became increasingly involved in war production, and by 1917 it became a controlled establishment under the munitions war act. To replace male employees who were called to fight in the war, female labor had been hired whenever possible. Recess Screws employed about 400 employees at the British plant by 1919.

The plant produced firing pins for hand grenades and trench mortars, fuse needles and detonating shells, guide pins used in shell fuses and gas checks screws for grenades. Throughout the war they produced almost 55 million units. Eventually the English plant was taken over by the government and P.L resigned as director of Recess Screws Ltd.

After his return to Canada he decided to enter the Untied States market. He approached Curtis Screws Company of Buffalo. After first round negotiations, P.L was frustrated and decided to pass on the opportunity as they could not reach an agreement.

His third major attempt involved the Ford Motor Company. From early years of the Milton, Ontario plant Ford Windsor accounted for a substantial part of Robertson’s production. By using socket head screws Ford made a considerable savings of $2.60 per car.

This savings captured the attention of the Detroit bosses and soon after P.L was in Detroit talking about expanding socket head screw production to supply all U.S. made Ford cars. Henry Ford refused to commit to a new product line without having a say in how and where the screws would be made. P.L was not happy with this idea and headed home. This meant P.L was letting go of vast potential in the U.S. market, which also included Ford Windsor (Ontario) which accounted for one third of his output of screws.

Later, P.L succeeded in developing an international market for brass screws and following this P.L concentrated on exclusivity on selling screws in bulk (kegs) to industrial customers. Firms paid a premium price for quality screws. For Robertson, this became a standard in both Canadian and International Markets. His next steps focused on business change to selling to more specific markets, electrical, furniture manufactures and automotive suppliers, etc.

In time, P.L introduced a new screwdriver to the market, something that only he could call his own. He created a “Handikit” exclusively and donated hundreds of kits to high school and woodworking classes, plant visitors or anyone simply interested in the product.

The market effort of the 1930’s increased sales and by late 1930’s P.L was widely recognized as a major player in the screw business. With almost 200 employees for a small town of 1900 people P.L Robertson became a Milton legend.

During the mid 1930’s, times were tough during the second world war, as P.L Robertson felt the weight of the many hard years, until PL caught a break, the armed services needed tremendous quantities of brass screws and Robertson was there to supply them. In addition, a traveling salesman for Robertson landed a contract where carloads of cadmium plated Robertson combination square/slot drive screws were needed for the plywood mosquito bomber aircraft. This was the largest order ever received by the company.
Around the end of the war PL received a phone call from a change to his financial advisor – PL was officially a millionaire.

Peter Lymburner Robertson died September 28, 1951. Today, Robertson Inc., is a global supplier of standard and specialty fasteners with locations throughout the world. Through our modern manufacturing technology, ongoing product development programs, highly skilled and dedicated people and enduring commitment to excellence, Robertson Inc. continues to build on our heritage of quality and innovation.

Note: this was taken from a not very user friendly page. More of this story can be found https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P._L._Robertson" target="_blank (US connection) or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_screw_drives#Robertson" target="_blank (scroll down to Robertson, more on UK connection)
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:25 pm

fccs wrote:And Mickey is not what I was expecting - but my question is, why would I need a bottle to fit in my pocket? :-? :wine:


so its easy to take it with you.... why else? I take one to the company christmas party, the bar service is pathetic (beer or pop) so I bring a mickey of rum so I can have a rum and coke. :toast:
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:58 pm

cairee wrote:
fccs wrote:And Mickey is not what I was expecting - but my question is, why would I need a bottle to fit in my pocket? :-? :wine:


so its easy to take it with you.... why else? I take one to the company christmas party, the bar service is pathetic (beer or pop) so I bring a mickey of rum so I can have a rum and coke. :toast:


Okay, that makes sense. I guess it's not much different than carrying a flask around (and no, I don't do that).
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Sun Nov 15, 2015 1:14 pm

Good morning. Here are today's lucky numbers:

1. All Dressed
adjective; (Canadian) (of a hot dog, hamburger, etc) served with all available garnishes (Collins English Dictionary). Since the dawn of this new century the phrase has become synonymous with Canada's favourite potato chip (crisps), none other that Frito Lay's Ruffles All Dressed. Apparently American's like them too, only Frito Lay will not sell them to the American market. This has prompted groups of Americans to sign petitions demanding their rights to the product as well as set up a Facebook page (albeit unsuccessfully) devoted to the cause and linking you to an online petition (great fun, see it here: https://www.change.org/p/firto-lay-bring-all-dressed-chips-to-the-united-states?just_created=true" target="_blank Unfortunately, all have fallen on deaf ears until very recently. At this very moment in time, but for a limited time only (Sept 14 to Dec 7, 2015). Ruffles All Dressed are available for purchase in the US. See news release here: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases ... 42682.html" target="_blank

It's the weekend, eh? Purchase a bag, grab a cold one to work on your favourite muscle and then enjoy both while you watch your favourite game or show. You will not be disappointed!

27. Toonie
The Canadian two dollar coin, commonly called the toonie, was introduced on February 19, 1996 by Public Works minister Diane Marleau. The toonie is a bi-metallic coin which on the reverse side bears an image of a polar bear by artist Brent Townsend. The obverse, like all other current Canadian circulation coins, has a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. It has the words "ELIZABETH II / D.G. REGINA" in a different typeface from any other Canadian coin; it is also the only coin to consistently bear its issue date on the obverse.

The coin is manufactured using a patented distinctive bi-metallic coin locking mechanism. The coins are estimated to last 20 years. The discontinued two-dollar bill was less expensive to manufacture, but on average each bill lasted only one year. "Toonie" is a portmanteau word combining the number "two" with the name of the loonie, Canada's one-dollar coin. It is occasionally spelled "twonie" or "twoonie", but Canadian newspapers and the Royal Canadian Mint use the "toonie" spelling.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Sun Nov 15, 2015 3:02 pm

Not what I expected a Toonie to be, but that gave me nine. :-) As for all dressed, where are those Fritos?????
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Sun Nov 15, 2015 3:28 pm

Not what I expected either of those to be, but All Dressed brings me to 9/10!!!

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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:16 pm

OK - I'm the host and this will be the one place I will brag about Canada. My country is beautiful, but we cannot take credit for that. We can take credit, though, for some of our achievements. Though the Loonie and Toonie are definitely odd names for daily currency, many would argue that Canada is the world's leader in designing innovative currency. We have beautiful coins of our own and mint coins for other nations. Read the last decade of innovations at our Royal Canadian Mint here: http://www.mint.ca/store/news/a-decade- ... kjIqY7F-0A" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank

Canadian award winning coins: http://www.mint.ca/store/mint/about-the-mint/awardwinning-coins-1200016#.VkjLF47F-0A" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank

With more images here: https://www.google.ca/search?q=canadian ... DwR7&dpr=1" target="_blank" target="_blank
Last edited by Linda Rose on Sun Nov 15, 2015 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:39 pm

9/10

this is going to be close!
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Mon Nov 16, 2015 1:12 am

Greetings all.

I have decided that with the different time zones involved, I need to be a bit more considerate in the few days that follow, especially to those who wake up after me. I will commit to revealing the lucky numbers between noon and 2pm, my time. That should be between 9 and 11am for Cairee, between 5 and 7pm for Jo, and all others somewhere in between. No need for anyone to get up at a more ridiculous time than me! All the best to all of you.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by chalicedhearts » Mon Nov 16, 2015 3:48 am

Still holding strong at 9/10...this is going to be another close one.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Mon Nov 16, 2015 6:35 pm

Greetings.

Must be quick today. I work for a charity and it is audit week! Here are today's numbers:


24. Snowbird[/b]
Canadian - a northerner (Canadian) who moves to a warmer southern state in the winter. But I cannot resist, here is the US definition - Irritating old people who come down to Florida from Northern states, drive like maniacs, and should be illegal.

5. Chesterfield
(noun) The Canadian Term for Couch or Sofa. Some view it as a more fancy variety of couch or sofa.
Although some think this word dates you, or perhaps is going the way of the dinosaur, we have in our area three furniture stores called "The Chesterfield Shop". Are there others still out there?
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Mon Nov 16, 2015 7:05 pm

None for me today, but had to laugh at the US definition for snowbird. :-) Neighbors a few doors down from me are snowbirds, but they go to Arizona. So far I can take the cold, so no need for me to snowbird at this time. :-)
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