Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Tue Nov 10, 2015 2:05 pm

Timbets sound delicious, eh? They, the timbits, bring me up to 5/10. Halfway there!

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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Tue Nov 10, 2015 4:58 pm

That would be a great t-shirt to walk around in!
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by tiffstitch » Tue Nov 10, 2015 6:55 pm

rcperryls wrote:Timbets sound delicious, eh? They, the timbits, bring me up to 5/10. Halfway there!

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Timbits are delicious and have a great variety of flavours. You definitely want to get them at a busy Tim Hortons though, because if they've sat around all day they're not as good. Busier places have fresh ones replaced. Excellent use of 'eh' as well. :D

Great Bingo Linda! I'm at 5/10.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Tue Nov 10, 2015 7:45 pm

Yay, both of today's are on my list - I'm up to five.

And I think I'd like a maple timbit, please.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Wed Nov 11, 2015 12:42 pm

Good morning.

Here we go with Day 8. Best of luck to all.

15. No-See-Ums
A small biting insect. A no-see-um isn’t the name for an actual insect. It’s just what some call any of those annoying, small, biting insects that bite you, yet are unseen. You hear them. You feel them. But those wretched things… you just no-see-um. I suppose some of these no-see-ums would be gnats or chiggers or midges, if we could actually lay our eyes upon them.

9. Freezies
Freezies, as most Canadians are aware, are like Popsicles, only that instead of being served on a stick, they come in a cheek-lacerating plastic sleeve/tube. In a world where the product is known by everything from California Snow to Ice Tickles, Canadians have fervently laid claim to the least-creative term for the summer treat. If you happen to know them as Otter Pops or Ice Poles, or any other name for that matter, please do comment.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Wed Nov 11, 2015 3:52 pm

None for me today. I thought No-see-ums were a Southern expression. We have them in droves, sometimes so many together that you can see em. Sometimes when it looks like someone is talking with their hands what they are doing is trying (to no avail) to shoo them away. Ick!!!


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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Wed Nov 11, 2015 5:14 pm

Freezies make one more for me. 6/10
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Wed Nov 11, 2015 9:16 pm

I love the term no-see-ums - I think I'll have to start using that. And thanks to the no-see-ums, I'm up to six.

I love the "cheek lacerating" description of Freezies. I know them as Otter Pops, and I like them (grape and blue being my favorite) - it's a trade-off. I can eat a Popsicle that will drip all over me, or I can wage war on my cheeks and stay clean with an Otter Pop. :-)
Last edited by fccs on Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Wed Nov 11, 2015 10:22 pm

fccs wrote:I love the term no-see-ums - I think I'll have to start using that. And thanks to the no-see-ums, I'm up to five.

I love the "cheek lacerating" description of Freezies. I know them as Otter Pops, and I like them (grape and blue being my favorite) - it's a trade-off. I can eat a Popsicle that will drip all over me, or I can wage war on my cheeks and stay clean with an Otter Pop. :-)



Any idea where the name Otter Pop comes from?
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:57 am

Linda Rose wrote:Any idea where the name Otter Pop comes from?


I haven't a clue - but when I googled it, Wikipedia described them as "Otter Pops are a brand of freezies." :-)
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:29 pm

fccs wrote:
Linda Rose wrote:Any idea where the name Otter Pop comes from?


I haven't a clue - but when I googled it, Wikipedia described them as "Otter Pops are a brand of freezies." :-)


Wow! How very helpful. This was the only thing I could find: The original Otter Pops were made of a delicious concoction of frozen, slushy, plastic-wrapped delight, which included 10% real fruit juice. However, the company that makes the vastly inferior, artificially-flavored Pop-Ice bought out the Otter-Pop company in 1996 and subsequently ruined the recipe (at least it was better than the Fla-Vor-Ice recipe). The exact origin of the "otter pop" name has been lost to history (as has its parent company). Speculation is that since otters are long, skinny, cute, aquatic mammals it was only logical to name long, skinny, cute, frozen aqueous snacks after them.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:38 pm

And here are today's words:

29. Wicket
The desk at the bank where you conduct transactions with a bank teller. When the teller goes to lunch, he or she will display a sign that says "This wicket closed." Also - You stand at a wicket when speaking to agents in government offices, bank tellers, etc.

23. Shinney
Shinney (also shinny, pick-up hockey, pond hockey, or "outdoor puck") is an informal type of hockey played on ice. It is also used as another term for street hockey. There are no formal rules or specific positions, and generally, there are no goaltenders. The goal areas at each end may be marked by nets, or simply by objects, such as stones or blocks of snow. Body checking and lifting or "roofing/reefing/raising the puck" (shooting the puck or ball so it rises above the ice) are often forbidden because the players are not wearing protective equipment. Shinny is a game that all levels of hockey enthusiasts can play because it requires no rink, requires no skills except ability to hold a stick and at the very least to try to touch the puck or ball when it goes by. Shinny may be completely non-competitive and recreational - scoring irrelevant - or competitive and scores kept.

In his book Country on Ice, Doug Beardsley claims that most Canadian hockey professional players have played some form of shinney in their youth.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by chalicedhearts » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:09 pm

Well none today but with all the other ones I up to 8/10. :whoop: Getting close. Learning some interesting new words that's for sure. Of course I have heard of No-See-Ums. I think most people have probably heard of and dealt with those annoying insects. lol.

Linda: Wow! Those pics are amazing! How up close and personal do you get to those sharks?
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:39 pm

Shinney brings me to 6/10. Shouldn't be surprised that a hockey expression found its way into a Canadianism Bingo. Must be a few getting close to this fascinating Bingo.

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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by tiffstitch » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:09 pm

I'm still a 5/10 and feeling very nostalgic for my youth in southern Ontario. :)
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:47 pm

I'm still at six, but I'm having fun learning some Canadianisms.
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Fri Nov 13, 2015 12:51 pm

Happy Friday. Hope you are all looking forward to the weekend.

22. Serviette
A small square of cloth or paper used while eating to protect the clothes, wipe the mouth and hands, etc.; a table napkin (of Old French and British origin, both of which shaped our nation)

3. Butter Tart
A butter tart is a type of small pastry tart highly regarded in Canadian cuisine and considered one of Canada's quintessential desserts. The tart consists of butter, sugar, syrup, and egg filled into a flaky pastry and baked until the filling is semi-solid with a crunchy top. The butter tart should not be confused with butter pie (a savoury pie from the Preston area of Lancashire, England) or with bread and butter pudding.

Recipes for the butter tart vary according to the families baking them. Because of this, the appearance and physical characteristics of the butter tart – the firmness of its pastry, or the consistency of its filling – also varies.

In general, the English Canadian tart consists of butter, sugar, and eggs in a pastry shell, similar to the French-Canadian sugar pie, or the base of the U.S. pecan pie without the nut topping. The butter tart is different from pecan pie in that it has a "runnier" filling due to the omission of corn starch. Raisins are in the traditional butter tart, but walnuts or pecans are commonly added. However purists contend that such additions should not be allowed.

Butter tarts are an integral part of Eastern Canadian cuisine and are objects of cultural pride of many communities across Ontario and indeed Canada. This cultural and community connection with the tart has spawned butter tart themed tourism such as the Butter Tart festival at Muskoka Lakes, Ontario, the trademarked "Butter Tart Trail" at Wellington North, Ontario and the "Butter Tart Tour" in Kawarthas Northumberland, Ontario. The two competing associations have since resolved their dispute through the mutual agreement to modify "The Butter Tart Tour" to "Kawarthas Northumberland Butter Tart Tour". The first Kawarthas Northumberland Butter Tart Tour Taste-Off was launched at the Flavour Festival in Peterborough on Sunday, April 28, 2013, where four bakeries were crowned winners by a panel of celebrity judges.

Ontario's Best Butter Tart Festival and Contest is an annual event held in Midland, Ontario. The contest portion of the festival attracts bakers from across Ontario, and is Canada's largest butter tart themed celebration, with over 50,000 tarts sold in the festival market in 2014.

Even National Geographic recognizes the significance of the butter tart in an article on Georgian Bay, Ontario. In October 2013, referring to a stand in Wasaga Beach, they stated that "It's the homemade Canadian butter tarts – flaky crust with gooey pecan filling – that set this place apart from other lakeside ice cream stands."
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Fri Nov 13, 2015 1:09 pm

up to 7 with butter tarts! I make between 8-12 dozen butter tarts every christmas. :D
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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Fri Nov 13, 2015 2:50 pm

Cairee, send me one please, they sound scrumptious. How could anything with those ingredients not be wonderful! And I didn't pick them :( or serviettes either. Still at 6/10. Good luck to those getting close!

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Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Fri Nov 13, 2015 4:12 pm

cairee wrote:up to 7 with butter tarts! I make between 8-12 dozen butter tarts every christmas. :D


Do you have a recipe to share?
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