Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Thu Nov 05, 2015 3:06 pm

:( none today. I do love Canadian bacon but never heard it called pea bacon before. If I had known what it was I would have picked it!

Carole
:D
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26984
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Thu Nov 05, 2015 5:20 pm

Yay - peameal bacon puts me at 2. :-) I picked it because it had bacon in the name - how can you go wrong? :-)
Debby

WIPs
Tiramisu
Curl Up with a Good Book
Lorikeets
Wolf
Past Present Forever
Tulip Medley
User avatar
 
Posts: 6784
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:10 pm
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Fri Nov 06, 2015 1:10 pm

Happy Friday! Today's numbers are:

20. RRSP
A Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) is a type of Canadian account for holding savings and investment assets. RRSPs have various tax advantages compared to investing outside of tax-preferred accounts. They were introduced in 1957 to promote savings for retirement by employees and self-employed people. They must comply with a variety of restrictions stipulated in the Canadian Income Tax Act. Approved assets include savings accounts, guaranteed investment certificates (GICs), bonds, mortgage loans, mutual funds, income trusts, corporate shares, foreign currency and labour-sponsored funds. Rules determine the maximum contributions, the timing of contributions, the assets allowed, and the eventual conversion to a Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF) at age 71.

18. Poutine
Poutine (/puːˈtiːn/; Quebec French:[put͡sɪn] ( listen)) is a Canadian dish, originating in the province of Quebec, made with french fries and fresh cheese curds topped with a light brown gravy-like sauce. This fast-food dish is typically found across Canada and in some places in the northern United States, less often elsewhere and is still considered 'exotic' in such places. It is sold in small "greasy spoon" type diners (commonly known as cantines or casse-croûtes in Quebec) and pubs, as well as by roadside chip wagons (commonly known as cabanes à patates, literally "potato shacks") and in hockey arenas. National and international chains such as Smoke's Poutinerie, New York Fries, McDonald's, Wendy's, A&W, KFC, Burger King, and Harvey's also sell mass-market poutine in Canada (although not always country-wide).

The dish is thought to have originated in rural Quebec, Canada, in the late 1950s and several Canadian communities claim to be the birthplace of poutine, including Drummondville (by Jean-Paul Roy in 1964), Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, and Victoriaville. Prior to this, since 1901, the closest dish to poutine was known as "Chips, cheese and gravy" and was widely available in the UK, particularly the north of England and Scotland. Some believe that the Canadian classic "poutine" was somewhat inspired by this European dish.

One often-cited tale is that of Warwick restaurateur Fernand Lachance of Le Café Ideal (formerly Le Lutin Qui Rit), who is said in 1957 to have exclaimed, "ça va faire une maudite poutine" ("it will make a damn mess") when asked by restaurant regular Eddy Lainesse to put a handful of curds on some french fries, hence the name. The sauce was allegedly added later, to keep the fries warm longer.

There are now many variations of poutine. Some restaurants offer poutine with such toppings as sausage, chicken, bacon, or Montreal-style smoked meat. More upscale poutine with three-pepper sauce, merguez sausage, foie gras or even caviar and truffle can now be found in Montreal restaurants.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Fri Nov 06, 2015 1:59 pm

YAY for cheese curds. Now I'm at 2/10! Can't believe that I never heard of Poutine since Wisconsin, where I went to school, is cheese curd country. Can't get them in most places outside of Wisconsin, at least no where I can find. I have a friend who is from Quebec and would bring cheese curds back after going back to visit family. Been years though since I have had some. And to melt them on french fries is genious! Have to stop now as I am making myself very hungry :roll:

Carole
:dance:
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26984
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by fccs » Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:07 pm

Three for me now. :-)
Debby

WIPs
Tiramisu
Curl Up with a Good Book
Lorikeets
Wolf
Past Present Forever
Tulip Medley
User avatar
 
Posts: 6784
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:10 pm
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Fri Nov 06, 2015 5:01 pm

I'm glad someone is enthusiastic about poutine. Though born and raised in Quebec, I have actually never tried it. I am with M. Lachance - I do think it looks like 'une maudite poutine'! Where I grew up in Pierrefonds, Quebec, there was a friterie that washed and sliced the potatoes only after you had ordered your fries. They were always beautifully golden with crispy outsides, softer insides - perfect for a light sprinkling of salt and vinegar. No need for all the other fixings for me!

This summer we brought our grandchildren to Montreal to see where their parents (and grandparents) had been born and lived in their younger years. They were not thrilled about the road trip until they heard we were visiting the poutine capital of the country. We went to a Poutinerie in Old Montreal, arguably the most popular on the island. They loved it. Each of the 3 children ordered a different variety, tried them all, sampled all of the adult's plates as well and declared Montreal Smoked Meat Poutine the winner. All other poutines now pale in comparison, and each have declared there is no point in ordering poutine in any of the Ontario restaurants that serve it.

BTW - all of the locations claiming to be the birth place of Canadian poutine were close to cheese dairies.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by chalicedhearts » Sat Nov 07, 2015 1:33 am

Poutine sounds really really good...Now I am going to have to make a trip to Canada to try some out...oh by the way I am now at 3/10 thanks to Poutine.
Gary Zahn
WIP: The Accolade
Disney Cinderella Castle
Moonlight Cabin
Celtic Cross Storykeep
Power and Grace
User avatar
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:57 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Sat Nov 07, 2015 9:34 am

Welcome to the weekend! I am off in a few minutes to begin a road trip to Montreal to celebrate my Mother's birthday. Hence the ridiculously early post this morning and likely very late post tomorrow. I should let you know that my travel route will be along the T-Can, or Trans Canada Highway. The highway is a transcontinental federal-provincial highway system that travels through all ten provinces of Canada between its Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean coasts to the west and east respectively. It is, I believe, still the world's longest national highway, with the main route spanning 8,030 km (4,990 mi).

Today's numbers:

7. Eaves trough
1. (Canada and Northern US) A trough under the eaves of a building for draining water from the roof; gutter.

10. Humidex
The humidex (short for humidity index) is an index number used by Canadian meteorologists to describe how hot the weather feels to the average person, by combining the effect of heat and humidity. The humidex is a dimensionless quantity based on the dew point, but it is equivalent to dry temperature in degrees Celsius. For example, if the temperature is 30 °C (86 °F), and the calculated humidex is 40, then it indicates the humid heat feels approximately like a dry temperature of 40 °C (104 °F).

According to the Meteorological Service of Canada, a humidex of at least 30 causes "some discomfort", at least 40 causes "great discomfort" and above 45 is "dangerous". When the humidex hits 54, heat stroke is imminent.

The current formula for determining the humidex was developed by J. M. Masterton and F. A. Richardson of Canada's Atmospheric Environment Service in 1979. Humidex differs from the heat index used in the United States in being derived from the dew point rather than the relative humidity.

The record humidex in Canada occurred on 14 July 1961, when Castlegar, British Columbia recorded a humidex of 53.4. This value was almost beaten on 25 July 2007 when Carman, Manitoba hit 53.0.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Sun Nov 08, 2015 1:34 pm

Happy Birthday to your Mom!! I hope y'all have a wonderful celebration! Eaves Trough brought me to 3/10. :D Another very new expression to me.

Carole
:dance:
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26984
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Mon Nov 09, 2015 2:34 am

Greetings fellow cross-stitchers. I hope you have enjoyed a wonderful weekend.

Carole - thank you for your good wishes for my Mom. I had a great time with my parents and sisters this weekend. It's always nice to go back for a visit, especially when a party with food and cake is involved.

Gary - you would love Canada. So much the same, yet so many differences. I do hope you check out the other side of the border someday. Mississauga, just outside of Toronto and very close to the airport, has a stitchery store second to none. Well worth the trip along with all the other great scenery and food as well.

And now for today's numbers:

21. Runners
A highly scientific Canadian version of the New York Times dialect quiz found that 85% of Canadians referred to their running shoes as runners, and not sneakers, Nikies, etc.

4. Canada Day
Canada Day (French: Fête du Canada) is the national day of Canada, a federal statutory holiday celebrating the anniversary of the July 1, 1867, enactment of the British North America Act, 1867 (today called the Constitution Act, 1867), which united three colonies into a single country called Canada within the British Empire. Originally called Dominion Day (French: Le Jour de la Confédération), the holiday was renamed in 1982, the year the Canada Act was passed. Canada Day observances take place throughout Canada as well as among Canadians internationally.

Frequently referred to as "Canada's birthday", particularly in the popular press, the occasion marks the joining of the British North American colonies of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Province of Canada into a federation of four provinces (the Province of Canada being divided, in the process, into Ontario and Quebec) on July 1, 1867. Canada became a kingdom in its own right on that date, called the Dominion of Canada, but the British parliament and Cabinet kept limited rights of political control over the new country that were shed by stages over the years until the last vestiges were surrendered in 1982, when the Constitution Act patriated the Canadian constitution.

Under the federal Holidays Act, Canada Day is observed on July 1. Most communities across the country will host organized celebrations for Canada Day, usually outdoor public events, such as parades, carnivals, festivals, barbecues, air and maritime shows, fireworks, and free musical concerts, as well as citizenship ceremonies for new citizens. However, the locus of the celebrations is the national capital, Ottawa, Ontario, where large concerts and cultural displays are held on Parliament Hill, with the governor general and prime minister typically officiating, though the monarch or another member of the Royal Family may also attend or take the governor general's place. Queen Elizabeth II was present for the official Canada Day ceremonies in Ottawa in 1990, 1992, 1997, and 2010, when more than 100,000 people attended the ceremonies on Parliament Hill. The Queen also participated in celebrations of Canada's 100th anniversary on July 1, 1967. Prince William and his wife took part in the events in Ottawa for Canada Day, 2011, the first time a member of the Royal Family other than the monarch and her consort had done so.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by chalicedhearts » Mon Nov 09, 2015 12:01 pm

Linda, Glad to hear you had a great weekend...Yes me and the wife are planning to go up there eventually. It is on our list of places to visit. Probably within the next year or two. We try to do a big trip each year to somewhere new. Next summer is Thailand to do some scuba diving.
I have several pairs of runners and now they put me at 5/10. Halfway there. :)
Gary Zahn
WIP: The Accolade
Disney Cinderella Castle
Moonlight Cabin
Celtic Cross Storykeep
Power and Grace
User avatar
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:57 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Mon Nov 09, 2015 3:10 pm

none for me today, but glad you had a great visit with your family. Still at 3/10. We used to call sneakers/runners/ whatever gym shoes. I guess because you had to wear them in the gym. Maybe that is a Chicagoism?

Carole
:thinks:
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26984
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:48 pm

Hello again.

Today's winning numbers are:

14. Molson Muscle
I must tell you that while I was preparing this particular BINGO game my friend from the UK was visiting and so I went through the list with him to see what he would know. He had a very interesting response to this one in particular. He did know that Molson's was a Canadian brewery and so guessed that it was the arm muscle that developed over time from lifting your beer glass/bottle to your mouth. I though that was quite clever. It is wrong, though. The correct definition, according to the Urban Dictionary is "A Canadian term meaning "Beer Belly" "; as in 'The boys are headin' down to the bar to work on their Molson Muscles'.

12. Loonie
The Canadian one dollar coin, commonly called the loonie, is a gold-coloured one-dollar coin introduced in 1987. It bears images of a common loon, a bird which is common and well known in Canada, on the reverse, and of Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse. It is produced by the Royal Canadian Mint at its facility in Winnipeg.

The coin's outline is an 11-sided curve of constant width. Its diameter of 26.5 mm and its 11-sidedness matched that of the already-circulating Susan B. Anthony dollar in the United States, and its thickness of 1.95 mm was a close match to the latter's 2.0 mm. Its gold colour differed from the silver-coloured Anthony dollar; however, the succeeding Sacagawea and Presidential dollars matched the loonie's overall hue. Other coins using a curve of constant width include the 7-sided British twenty pence and fifty pence coins (the latter of which has similar size and value to the loonie, but is silver in colour).

LUCKY LOONIE - Officials for the 2002 Salt Lake Winter Olympics invited the National Hockey League's ice making consultant, Dan Craig, to oversee the city's E Center arena, where the ice hockey tournament was being held. Craig invited a couple of members from the ice crew in his hometown of Edmonton to assist. One of them, Trent Evans, secretly placed a loonie at centre ice. He originally placed a dime, but added the loonie after the smaller coin quickly vanished as the ice surface was built up. He placed the coins after realizing there was no target at centre ice for referees to aim for when dropping the puck for a faceoff. A thin yellow dot was painted on the ice surface over the coins, though the loonie was barely visible to those who knew to look for it.

Keeping the coin a secret, Evans told only a few people of its placement and swore them to secrecy. Among those told were the players of the men's and women's teams. Both Canadian teams went on to win gold medals. Several members of the women's team kissed the spot where the coin was buried following their victory. After the men won their final, the coin was dug up and given to Wayne Gretzky, the team's executive-director, who revealed the existence of the "lucky loonie" at a post-game press conference.

The lucky loonie quickly became a piece of Canadian lore. The original lucky loonie was donated to the Hockey Hall of Fame, and Canadians have subsequently hidden loonies at several international competitions. Loonies were buried in the foundations of facilities built for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

Capitalizing on the tradition, the Royal Canadian Mint has released a commemorative edition "lucky loonie" for each Olympic Games since 2004.
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by rcperryls » Mon Nov 09, 2015 7:05 pm

Well I don't like beer, but now I guess I'll have to try Molson . Up to 4/10 today!

Carole
:dance:
HAEDs:
O Kitten Tree
Dancing with the Cat
Giraffe Silhouette
Leffet Papillon
mini Moonlight
Little Dreamers Tree
Others: I am My Beloved Sampler
2016 Finishes:
Hardanger Sampler
HAED Shiver Meow Timbers
BB8
User avatar
 
Posts: 26984
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:36 pm
Location: SC, USA

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:16 pm

rcperryls wrote:Well I don't like beer, but now I guess I'll have to try Molson . Up to 4/10 today!

Carole
:dance:


Molson is not a bad brew for Canadian beer, but I'm a bad Canadian, I prefer imports :oops:

Im also at 4 of 10.
:wip:
Mables 2016 SAL
Holland Springtime Mandalla (chatelaine)
User avatar
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:33 pm
Location: BC Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Tue Nov 10, 2015 12:16 am

Gary,

How lucky you are to be taking such a trip! Have you been scuba diving before?
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by chalicedhearts » Tue Nov 10, 2015 3:31 am

Hey Linda,

Yes me and my wife go scuba diving any chance we get. We have been diving now for about 8 years. Its not a sport for everybody but we really do love it. There really is nothing like it in the world. Here is a pic of us and my daughter after a shore dive we just did a couple months ago and a couple pictures I took of some of the bigger sea creatures we saw while diving in the Florida Keys this past summer.

Image

This is a Caribbean Reef Shark

Image

This is a Nurse Shark

Image

And some reef fish

Image
Gary Zahn
WIP: The Accolade
Disney Cinderella Castle
Moonlight Cabin
Celtic Cross Storykeep
Power and Grace
User avatar
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:57 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Tue Nov 10, 2015 11:06 am

Wow! Those pics are amazing! How up close and personal do you get to those sharks?
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by Linda Rose » Tue Nov 10, 2015 12:43 pm

Good morning. Hope you enjoy today's words.

8. Eh?
The Cambridge Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Neologism Profile, Encarta Dictionary, American History Dictionary, and most importantly, the Canadian Oxford Dictionary all classify eh as Canadian. From the Merriam-Webster - "used to ask for confirmation or repetition or to express inquiry ; used especially in Canadian English in anticipation of the listener's or reader's agreement". Here are some samples:
TYPE OF EH SAMPLE SENTENCE
1. Statement of opinion: Nice day, eh?
2. Statements of fact: It goes over here, eh?
3. Commands: Open the window, eh?
4. Exclamations: What a game, eh?
5. Questions: What are they trying to do, eh?
6. To mean ‘pardon’: Eh? What did you say?
8. Insults: You’re a real snob, eh?
9. Accusations: You took the last piece, eh?
10. The narrative eh: This guy is up on the 27th floor, eh? Then he gets out on the ledge, eh?

Canadians know that Americans love to make fun of us for this expression.

[b]25. Timbit
Timbits is the brand name of a bite-sized confectionery sold at the Canadian-based franchise Tim Hortons. Although Timbits look similar to doughnut holes, they are not "doughnut holes" and are in fact made with their own cutter. The treats were introduced in April 1976 and are now available in various flavours that differ from store to store. Flavours include, but are not limited to, chocolate glazed, jelly filled, dutchie, honey dip, sour cream glazed, old-fashioned plain, old fashion glazed, blueberry, strawberry, raspberry, lemon, apple cider, orange-tangerine, creamy caramel, cherry cake, honey cruller, pumpkin spice, and apple fritter. The "bit" in the word Timbit is an acronym for Big In Taste, which was half of the slogan for the original 1976 ad campaign "Big In Taste, Small In Size". It is also a play on the word "tidbit" (a delicate bit or morsel of food).
Linda
User avatar
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:07 am
Location: Georgetown, Ontario, Canada

Re: Let's Play Canadianisms Bingo

by cairee » Tue Nov 10, 2015 1:06 pm

one more makes 5!

I had to pick Eh, its a perfectly good word

I had a tshirt that read
"Why do Canadian say Eh?
Eh: Canadian term for right, ok, please, maybe, thank you, how 'bout it, dont you, used after a statement or question, said with spirit and pride even to visitors. its better than saying 'huh' "
:wip:
Mables 2016 SAL
Holland Springtime Mandalla (chatelaine)
User avatar
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:33 pm
Location: BC Canada

PreviousNext

Who is online
Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest